Parallel surfaces and Minkowski formula

Suppose {X:M^n\rightarrow \mathbb{R}^{n+1}} is an immersed orientable closed hypersurface. {N} is the inner unit normal for {X(M^n)} and denote by {\sigma} the second fundamental form of the immersion and by {\kappa_i}, {i=1,\cdots,n} the principle curvatures at an arbitrary point of {M}. The {r-}th mean curvature of {H_r} is obtained by applying {r-}elementary symmetric function to {\kappa_i}. Equivalently, {H_r} can be defined through the identity

\displaystyle P_n(t)=(1+t\kappa_1)\cdots(1+\kappa_n)=1+\binom{n}{1}H_1 t+\cdots+\binom{n}{n}H_n t^n

for all real number {t}. One can see that {H_1} represents the mean curvature of {X}, {H_n} is the gauss-Kronecker curvature. {H_2} can reflect the scalar curvature of {M} on the condition that the ambient manifold is a space form.

We want to study the consequence of moving the hypersurface parallel. Namely, define {X_t} to be

\displaystyle X_t= X-tN.

When {t} is small enough, {X_t} is well defined immersed hypersurface. Suppose {e_1,\cdots, e_n} are principle directions at a point {p} of {M}, then

\displaystyle \quad(X_t)_*(e_i)=(1+\kappa_it)e_i

here we identify {X_*(e_i)=e_i} as abbreviation. This implies that {N_t= N\circ X_t^{-1}} is also an unit normal field of {X_t}. The area element {dA_t} will be

\displaystyle dA_t=(1+t\kappa_1)\cdots(1+t\kappa_n)dA=P_n(t)dA.

The second fundamental form of {X_t} with respect to {N} will be

\displaystyle \sigma_t(v,w)=\langle N_t,\nabla^{\mathbb{R}^{n+1}}_vw\rangle=-\langle \nabla^{\mathbb{R}^{n+1}}_vN_t,w\rangle

for all {v,w} tangent vector fields on {X_t(M)}. Plugging in {v=(X_t)_*(e_i)} and {w=(X_t)_*(e_j)}, we get

\displaystyle (\nabla^{\mathbb{R}^{n+1}}_vw)(X_t(p))=(\nabla^{\mathbb{R}^{n+1}}_{e_i}e_j)(X(p))

\displaystyle \nabla_{v}^{\mathbb{R}^{n+1}}N_t=-\frac{\kappa_i}{1+t\kappa_i}v

So {e_1,\cdots, e_n} are also principle directions for {X_t} and principle curvatures are

\displaystyle \frac{\kappa_i}{1+t\kappa_i}

Another way to see this is by choosing a geodesic local coordinates such that {\partial_iX} are the principle directions of {X} at {p}. Then

\displaystyle \partial_j\partial_iX=\Gamma_{ij}^k\partial_kX+\kappa_iN\delta_{ij}

\displaystyle \partial_iN=-\kappa_i\partial_iX

\displaystyle \partial_i X_t=\partial_i X-t\partial_i N=\partial_i X+t\kappa_i\partial_iX

\displaystyle \partial_j\partial_iX_t=(1+t\kappa_i)\partial_j\partial_iX=(1+t\kappa_i)(\Gamma_{ij}^k\partial_kX+\kappa_iN\delta_{ij})

Since {g^{ij}_t=(1+\kappa_it)^{-2}\delta_{ij}} at {p}. Therefore we get the principle curvature are {\frac{\kappa_i}{1+t\kappa_i}}.

Therefore the mean curvature {H(t)} for {X_t} is

\displaystyle H(t)=\frac{1}{n}\frac{P_n'(t)}{P_n(t)}

Since we have identity

\displaystyle \Delta|X_t|^2=2n(1+H\langle X_t,N\rangle)

which implies

\displaystyle \int_M\left(1+H(t)\langle X_t,N\rangle\right)dA_t=0

Plugging in all the information,

\displaystyle \int_M\left(nP_n(t)+P_n'(t)\langle X,N\rangle-tP_n'(t)\right)dA=0

Reorder the terms in the above identity by the order of {t}, we get

\displaystyle \int_M (H_{r-1}+H_r\langle X,N\rangle )dA=0

One can use this to prove Heintze-Karcher inequality. There are Minkowski formula in Hyperbolic space and \mathbb{S}^n also.

Remark: S. Montiel and Anotnio Ros, compact hypersurfaces: the alexandrov theorem for higher order mean curvatures. Differential Geometry, 52, 279-296

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