One example of blowing up corner

Consider {u(x,y)=\sqrt{x^2+y^4}} on {\mathbb{R}^2_+=\{(x,y):x\geq 0, y\geq 0\}}. Notify {\mathbb{R}^2_+} has a corner at the origin and {u} is not smooth at the origin. {u\approx x} when {x\geq y^2} and {u\approx y^2} when {x\leq y^2}. We want to resolve {u} by blowing up the origin through a map {\beta}. After blowing up, {W} looks like the following picture.

 

b_map

Denote {W=[\mathbb{R}^2_+,(0,0)]} and {\beta:W\rightarrow \mathbb{R}^2_+} is the blow down map. On {W\backslash lb}(near A), {\beta} takes the form

\displaystyle \beta_1(\xi_1,\eta_1)=(\xi_1^2,{\xi_1\eta_1})

where {\xi_1} is the boundary defining function for ff and {\eta_1} is boundary defining function for rb. Similarly on {W\backslash rb}(near B), {\beta} takes the form

\displaystyle \beta_2(\xi_2,\eta_2)=(\xi_2\eta^2_2,\eta_2)

where {\xi_2} is a bdf for lb and {\eta_2} is a bdf for ff. One can verify that {\beta} is a diffeomorphism {\mathring{W}\rightarrow \mathring{\mathbb{R}}^2_+}. Let {w=\beta^* u}. Then {w} is a polyhomogeneous conormal function on {W}. Its index can be denoted {(E,F,H)} correspond to lb, ff and rb.

\displaystyle E=\{(n,0)\}, F=\{(2n,0)\}, H=\{(2n,0)\}

Suppose {\pi_1} is the projection to {x} coordinate. Consider {f=\pi_1\circ \beta:W\rightarrow \mathbb{R}_+}, {f} is actually a {b-}fibration. Then the push forward map {f_*} maps {w} to a polyhomogeneous function on {\mathbb{R}^+}.

\displaystyle f_*w=\pi_* u=\int_0^\infty u(x,y)dy

In order to make {u} is integrable, let us assume {u} support {x\leq 1} and {y\leq 1}. What is the index for {f_* w} on {\mathbb{R}^+}?

\displaystyle \int_0^1\sqrt{x^2+y^4}dy=\int_0^{\sqrt{x}}\sqrt{x^2+y^4}dy+\int_{\sqrt{x}}^1\sqrt{x^2+y^4}dy

For the first integral, letting {y^2/x=t}

\displaystyle \int_0^{\sqrt{x}}\sqrt{x^2+y^4}dy=x\sqrt{x}\int_0^1\sqrt{1+t^4}dt=c_0x\sqrt{x}

For the second integral, letting {x/y^2=t}

\displaystyle \int_{\sqrt{x}}^1\sqrt{x^2+y^4}dy=\frac{1}{2}x\sqrt{x}\int_x^1t^{-\frac{5}{2}}\sqrt{t^2+1}dt

Since the Taylor series

\displaystyle \sqrt{1+t^2}=1+\frac{1}{2}t^2-\frac{1}{8}t^4+\cdots,\quad \text{for }|t|<1

Consequently

\displaystyle \int_{\sqrt{x}}^1\sqrt{x^2+y^4}dy=a_0+a_1x+a_2x\sqrt{x}+\cdots

Combining all the above analysis, the index for {f_*w} is {\{(n,0)\}\cup \{\frac{n}{2},0\}}

From another point of view, the vanishing order of {f} on each boundary hypersurface of {W} are {e_f(lb)=1}, {e_f(\text{ff})=2} and {e_f(rb)=0}. {f} maps lb and ff to the boundary of {\mathbb{R}^+}. Therefore the index of {f_*w} is contained in

\displaystyle \frac{1}{e_f(lb)}E\overline{\cup}\frac{1}{e_f(\text{ff})}F=E\overline{\cup}\frac{1}{2}F

Remark: Daniel Grieser, Basics of {b-}Calculus.

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